Motorola Xoom – Throwback to the First True Tablet

Motorola Xoom Wi-Fi – Throwback to the First True Tablet

INTRODUCTION

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Motorola, a company that temporarily died but is now at a revival stage and propelling itself back to the top. With hits like Moto X 2013, Moto G, Moto X 2014 and the recently announced Nexus 6, Motorola is doing it right by targeting budget consumer looking for the best and cheapest Android Experience.

Tablets are one of those device you probably don’t need but you have one anyways. Back in 2011, only the tablet most of us knew was iPad. Little did we know, me included, that Motorola released a competitor. Probably one of its downfall was the steep price, as admittedly back then iOS was far better.

During that time Motorola Xoom was hailed the first true tablet as it was the one who bore the first tablet oriented Android OS Honeycomb.

I recently got a hold of this device and, with respect to today, it is painstakingly slow, luckily, 3 years and counting, Xoom continues to get dev support and I bravely charged into the unknown to root my device and install a custom OS. After a few failures and more reading, I have successfully installed an Unofficial CyanogenMod 4.4.4 KitKat. So, with respect to 2014, and what can the Motorola Xoom actually offer you? Read on and find out!

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XOOM WIFI – BASICS AND THEN SOME

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Xoom is a 10.1 Inch Giant with a resolution of 12800×800 this is probably one of the first tablet to sport an HD display. Even though its sports an HD Display the 10.1 inch screen is just too big, sometimes, it doesn’t look like its HD. Kind of like an 800×480 on a 5 inch screen.

Consumers generally buy tablet for one purpose. Their multimedia driver, for music, on loudspeaker and headsets attached, it’s surprisingly good, and the two speakers at the back is an ok choice for a big tablet. Today, front speakers should be the norm but back then, when tablets were just starting, the back was the obvious way to go. Headsets attached, Xoom offers great audio output with loudness reaching high levels.

Video playback takes a hit on large videos, it can play some 720p ok but 1080p is a big no-no. Again, use MX Player Pro for maximum satisfaction and be sure to enable Software Decoding. Otherwise, other videos will play fine.

For Gaming, Xoom understandably has lags, but I asked some of my colleagues to play with it, Contra and Dead Trigger and most of them seem to give a positive feedback.

If you have been with Android since time immemorial, you would know that Web Browsing feels slow and half-baked, certainly was the case in Honeycomb. KitKat showed improvements, but given the hardware’s age, you will notice some delays opening and loading pages.

YouTube streaming has been significantly improved by KitKat in Xoom, I actually use it more than I expected.

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Xoom also features a 5MP Rear Camera, 2MP Front Camera, and a micro-HDMI port. Nothing can be expected from the camera, it has a relatively small Field-of-View and pictures are easily blurred front or rear. The micro-HDMI port still works with the KitKat update but it seems to stretch the picture more on a bigger screen.

The battery life has also been improved by KitKat and it actually performs as well as other tablets today with typical 3-4 hours of screen on time and crazy standby-time. It can last you a week when you don’t use it. I’m not kidding.

CONCLUSION

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By today, Motorola Xoom is way past its prime, even KitKat could not save it and I believed it has reached its full potential. Still, with the prices of 10 inch tablets relatively steep, Xoom may still be a good choice if you need basic tasks to be done. It functions fine as a YouTube streamer, Music Player, non-HD video player and a so-so browser. Ultimately, it rests on you, the consumer if you want to pick this up.

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